Are newspapers dead?

The death of newspapers?

By Anthony Molyneaux

With Independent Media shutting down it’s printing presses on the 31st March 2014, the reality of newspapers dying out is now the latest addition that is falling on our doorstep.

Cape Town Printers in Parow has now taken over the printing of established names such as the Cape Argus and the Cape Times after the cessation of Independent Medias printing press. The rolling pages of print rush by with purpose, producing 30,000 newspaper prints in less than two hours. The entire process is beautiful to watch and efficient. Yet their efficiency is now compared to that of a click of a button. The newspaper world seems to be in an ancient state when compared.

Devin Moss, the cost accountant at CTP, still believes there is more staying power in the newspaper industry than it is given credit for. “Community newspapers and free newspapers, where the companies are getting their revenue from advertising and not from the sale of the newspapers, is still expanding in many areas,” states Moss. 

All over Cape Town, newspapers are cradled by the elderly while the youth cradle hand-held devices. The times are changing and the differences are visible everywhere you look. Are the youth still interested in newspapers?

Catherine Clery, a student from Los Angeles, working in Cape Town says she would read through a newspaper if it was freely available on the street yet wouldn’t go out of her way to purchase a newspaper.

Ray de Freitas, a 24 year old soccer coach from Cape Town also doesn’t buy into the newspaper market and says its far easier to access news from his phone.

Are newspapers becoming a thing of the past, much like bell bottoms and Blockbuster? Or will they stay around serving communities as they have for so long.

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